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The Next Generation: Recruiting Millennials to your company

July 18, 2017

A recruitment company writes of their experience hiring and motivating younger generations with the knowledge that by 2020 half the working population will be under 40.

A blog has offered tips to employers on recruiting young people, or ‘millennials’, as they have become known. Ben Thompson, of Oxfordshire-based recruitment company Thompson and Terry Ltd., argues that companies need to rethink their traditional methods in order to attract applications from the younger generation.

It is stated that Millennials (defined here as those aged between 22 and 31) live in an increasingly-technological world, where they make both personal and professional choices in a digital manner.  They have been both pioneers and guinea pigs for this new way of living, which combined with a lack of trust in traditional institutions means they present a new challenge for employers.

One of the suggestions for overcoming this is for hiring companies to utilise social media, both in advertising vacancies (owing to traditional methods of advertising such as newspapers becoming less popular) and also to give employers a chance to research their candidates in advance of the interview stage. Furthermore, Thompson offers a variety of additional motivations for millennial workers, based on young staff they have recruited for both their own company and others’. These include flexibility in when and where hours are worked; added responsibility, providing an opportunity for them to prove themselves early; extra benefits beyond simply their salary (such as days off, social drinks, and lunch provided by the company); and clear career pathways and opportunities to progress. An example used in the blog relates an occasion where a client created the position of Assistant Sales Manager in order to placate a highly-performing staff member who sought a promotion, despite there being no vacancy immediately above them. It is said that such a move by the company led to the employee

Furthermore, Thompson offers a variety of additional motivations for millennial workers, based on young staff they have recruited for both their own company and others’. These include flexibility in when and where hours are worked; added responsibility, providing an opportunity for them to prove themselves early; extra benefits beyond simply their salary (such as days off, social drinks, and lunch provided by the company); and clear career pathways and opportunities to progress. An example used in the blog relates an occasion where a client created the position of Assistant Sales Manager in order to placate a highly-performing staff member who sought a promotion, despite there being no vacancy immediately above them. It is said that such a move by the company led to the employee feeling valued and rewarded, despite doing essentially the same role under a different title, and therefore the employee was more likely to remain with the company.

Thompson argues that it is being able to understand the motivations of a company’s younger staff that is key to a successful working relationship. Although acknowledging the risk of generalisation, he concludes that employers would be naive to ignore the high volume of available research on younger generations in the workplace if they hope to capitalise on the new wave of up-and-coming talent.

You can read the blog in full here.

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