UK office workers experience 90 percent stress

April 29, 2016

business-technologyMeetings using technology cause stress related problems.

New research shows that “nine in ten UK office workers experience seriously elevated stress levels when dealing with troublesome technology during meetings”, reported bmmagazine this week. This can be anything from “lowered productivity to lost business and even lost promotions”, it said.

When dealing with difficulties with technological equipment, peoples heart rates increased to 179bpm compared with the normal resting heart rate of 60-100bpm which clearly indicates stress. Research also shows that staff who are made to leave their work in order to sort out technological problems regularly, may seriously suffer negative consequences which could lead to the business also suffering, the report said.

Amongst the biggest problems in the work place is the “meeting room technology that does not work seamlessly”, and “sharing content and screens and finding the right cables to connect to in-room devices”.

“In trying to deal with tech problems, staff are wasting significant amounts of their valuable time: 60 percent try to fix problems themselves, 49 percent call IT/tech support, 30 percent end up giving up with the tech and going to their plan B. 15 percent even postpone meetings until technology problems can be fixed”, reports bmmagazine.

The majority of people produce handouts to prepare for technological failure and many coordinate in advance with their IT and some 44 percent will do a rehearsal using the technology. Because of this many have missed important deadlines and personal promotions.

“15 percent reported that their meeting room technology struggles actually lost the company business”, implying that poor performance in meetings using technology, effectively has a damaging effect “damaging both personal and corporate reputations”. 81 percent believe that this should be taken more seriously.

Dr David Lewis, Neuropsychologist and Director of Mind Labs International said, “People show a clear stress response when faced with difficulties in getting meeting room technology to work. Stress in the workplace does not have a positive impact. People miss deadlines, and some even report that they have missed out on promotions as a result. This should not be happening! Removing these stresses from workers should be a top priority for businesses.”

Lieven Bertier, Head of Product Management ClickShare said, “Investing in meeting room technology which works at the click of a button will significantly help in reducing complexity and stress from office workers lives. When office staff can share screens more easily and collaborate more easily, businesses benefit by becoming more efficient. Having a more productive and efficient business has a positive outcome for businesses growth, and the bottom line.”

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

Categories : Around the Industry

Tags :

Broken printer used to develop children’s’ skills

April 29, 2016

A kindergarten in Montana lets children dismantle technology.5720dff2b6938_image

After a printer broke at Glacier Gateway Elementary School, Addy Connelly, kindergarten teacher, decided to let the children take it apart, reports The Hungry Horse News. The children are encouraged to use screwdrivers and other tools which promotes the finer motor skills. Using needle nose pliers to cut the wires connecting the ink cartridge to the printer a child delightedly announces that he has managed the task.

Connelly, who has worked as a kindergarten teacher for seven years, also encourages the children to work as a team by helping one another with the tasks. “It’s fun to take something apart, but the children are also practicing many different skills, Twisting a screwdriver or cutting a wire helps them strengthen and coordinate their hand muscles to be able to write better”, she also said that it encourages problem solving.

“There’s things that I can’t do in a lesson plan, it’s spontaneous. It allows them to do their own learning and exploration. They talk about it and are taking an interest. And they go home and they talk about these things.” Children have always taken things apart, that’s how they learn how things work, but this is a new initiative in schools, says the report, “some educators call it an ‘un-makerspace”, which evolved from the “trend of a maker-space” , where children use their imaginations to make things using raw materials. In more senior classes the” un-maker space” can be combined with a written assignment.

Connelly always gives a safety talk before these classes and demonstrates how to use the tools, there have been no accidents to date, she says. By guiding the children and helping them if the screws are too tight or helping cut thicker wires, she engages with even the most “lost” children or those struggling to read. These sessions take place in the free periods at the school and keep the children occupied and interested throughout the term time.

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

Categories : Around the Industry

Tags :

Over one million solid ink machines in use

April 27, 2016

Xerox solid inkXerox reported on the successes of its solid ink ColorQube machines.

The OEM stated that the “innovative, award-winning” technology was invented in 1986, and “first brought to market in 1991”, adding that it is “easy to use and produces stunning colour print quality”. The OEM also claimed that the printers generate “up to 90 percent less printing waste than comparable colour laser printers” as well as an “incredibly low total cost of ownership”.

Now, “more than one million solid ink machines are in use”, serving “thousands of customers who produce more than six billion pages each year”. As a result, the OEM says it “works to lower running costs while improving performance and quality”, and though the technology was “developed for the graphic arts market, it quickly appealed to general office users because of its simplicity and ease of use”.

Citing a 2008 InfoTrends report, Xerox quoted the analysts’ perspective that the system “is much less complicated compared to Xerography with fewer moving components and fewer replaceable supplies, which translates to the potential for lower overall operating costs”. The OEM also claimed that “cartridge-free solid ink lowers running costs by drastically reducing the number of items customers must replace. That’s why we’re able to offer colour page prices for less”.

It also highlighted the two separate pricing plans the technology is offered with, including a “hybrid colour plan” that “classifies documents based on the actual amount of colour use”, and a pay-as-you-go model, concluding that “if you print lots of colour pages, Xerox solid ink printers and multifunction printers can help you realize a significant savings on 70 percent of the colour pages you print every day. You get exceptional value, with a total cost of ownership that’s hard to beat”.

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

Categories : Products and Technology

Tags :

Katun reveals MPS statistics

April 27, 2016

katunMPSThe company’s Dealer Fleet Management (KDFM) offering manages over 5,200 different OEM models.

In an infographic, the company reported that the KDFM MPS programme aims to “make your business life more productive and profitable”, adding that it can also “optimise your costs and ensure customer satisfaction”. Amongst the statistics offered are that over 5,200 different OEM models are “managed in [the] KDFM portal”, including printers, copiers and MFDs.

In turn, over 80 different OEM brands are represented, including: Brother; Canon; Ricoh; Kyocera; Konica Minolta; Sharp; Toshiba; Lexmark; Samsung; HP Inc; OKI; Dell and Xerox. Katun added that the programme is “compatible with all and independent from the OEM”, and noted that there are “up to 20 available alerts per device […] depending on the OEM and selected device”.

These alerts include those relating to toner level, drum units, development units, waste containers, volume and stale data, and finally, the company noted that “full support” for KDFM is available in seven languages.

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

Categories : Around the Industry

Tags :

Biuromax announces new toner

April 26, 2016

The new toner powder is for use in remanufactured cartridges in Xerox and Lexmark printers.

Lexmark's C950

Lexmark’s C950

The company announced that its new toner powder will be complimented with drums, chips for drums and toner cartridges, doctor blades and charge rollers. The toner can be used in both the Lexmark C950 CMYK and in the following Xerox WorkCentre machines: 7655; 7675; 7755; DC240; 250; 260; and 350. The powder is available in ten kilogramme bags and one kilogramme bottles.

For more information, visit www.biuromax.com.pl.

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

Categories : Products and Technology

Tags :

Ink innovation for the blind

April 22, 2016

jwt_touchable_ink_mapNew technology enables braille printing through normal printers.

A new ink based solution called Touchable Ink has been developed by advertising agency, J Walter Thompson Bangkok, Thammasat University and Samsung Thailand. Using a normal printer, the new technology will “enable braille printing on normal paper” and will be cheaper than using a braille printer”, with the ink said to possibly be “a reliable substitute to the old coding system”.

Allowing “embossed printing of non-braille characters and other shapes and patterns”, this has endless prospects. Satit Jantawiwat, CCO at J. Walter Thompson Bangkok, said: “This will open up a new world to people with visual impairment and revolutionise their knowledge accessibility. Some of them were born blind and have never really known many things that may be common for people with normal vision, such as math symbols, musical notation symbols, and drawings or paintings.

“Touchable Ink gives them the key to unlock this door and enter a more resourceful world of tactile sensations, either to ease their everyday life or to broaden their accessibility to more fields of learning like music, mathematics and art, for example.”

The new invention is being tested at the Thailand Association of the Blind using equipment and research and development consultation from Thai Samsung Electronics. The Department of Chemistry and J. Walter Thompson Bangkok are now proceeding with patenting.

Parattajariya Jalayanateja, Managing Director of J. Walter Thompson Bangkok, added: “The Touchable Ink project began from a study of visually-impaired people that led to better awareness of their needs. As a group of people who are part of our society, their needs are not different from people who can see. They want to live happily like people who have normal vision. They are proud to be self-reliant, being able to perform small and big tasks themselves and minimize their dependence on other people.”

Dr. Nopparat Plucktaveesak, Head of Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Thammasat University, commented: “This Touchable Ink innovation was a source of much pride for the university. It is a Thai invention that, with continuing support and development further on, has the potential to benefit visually impaired people worldwide. It would enable the blind people to print from normal printer with price starts less than THB 2,000 ($/€57), instead of braille embosser which costs at least THB 100,000 ($/€2,537).”

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

Categories : Products and Technology

Tags :

Konica Minolta launches new range in India

April 22, 2016

The OEM announced its launch of office and production printers, adding to its existing product lines.konicaprinters-669x420

DQ India reported that the new printers include: the bizhub 165e; 185e; 206; 226; 227; 287; 367; C227; C368; C308; and C258, a mixture of colour and monochrome MFPs. These latest models have touch screens and include some new features to “increase efficiency, flexibility and save energy”. The printers are said to be “ideal” for SMBs offering more output to match employee output, and offer advanced wireless, mobile and cloud and enables printing.

About 51 percent of recycled materials make up the MFP main body, while another feature is an advanced security programme to protect important and sensitive information and “authentication on the MFP main unit”, such as IC and biometric card authentication and TPM. Konica Minolta’s new series also offers its exclusive Emperon print system and Simitri HD toner for “more defined and clear images”.

The OEM also launched the bizhub PRO 1100, a monochrome production printer offering new applications and functions with a faster turn around time, a colour scanner and software to create apps on the printer, thus enabling management of change and demand of “internal and external print shops”.

This model has the ability to store 9,000 sheets in five cassettes, and with the new “bypass tray” is ready for “any high volume work”, even “extensive missed media jobs”. The “outstanding output quality” of this printer is founded by the “high quality technological features”, a resolution of 1,200 x 1,200dpi, an exclusive screening technology and a tone curve utility which allows customised tone curve adjustments.

Yuji Nakata, Managing Director of Konica Minolta Business Solutions Pvt Ltd, commented: “Carrying the legacy of smart printing technology forward, in today’s competitive business world Konica Minolta inducts ‘A Breath of Fresh Air’ to their existing line of MFP and production printers. For [a] competitive business world, MFPs and production printers are now part of [a] packaged solution that facilitates value added services, in terms of efficiency, effectiveness, improved and optimisation”.

Mr. Balakrishnan, Executive General Manager, added: “Keeping the company’s vision in mind, Konica Minolta is relentlessly working towards specific eco- friendly technology. As an enhanced series of MFPs and production printers, the bizhub series exemplify how customers can count on Konica Minolta for solutions that allow them to manage information faster and more efficiently with less impact to the environment.”

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

 

Categories : Products and Technology

Tags :

Inkjet technology used to print DNA

April 22, 2016

UK company Arrayjet has launched a consultancy for life sciences, offering its bio-printing expertise as a service.imgID59576689_jpg-pwrt3

Herald Scotland reports that the instrumental company is offering its expertise worldwide, in bio-printing to businesses that are involved in life science. Using printers with inkjet print heads, biological material which includes DNA taken from a single gene, protein or antibody is printed onto glass slides.

This creates microarrays which are similar to a microchip in size and information, and are used for “biological screening in large scale diagnostic or genetic tests”. Arrayjet Advance Service offers its company’s scientific team as well as the automated laboratory site which will offer accurate and rapid analytics using inkjet technology. CEO Iain McWilliam (pictured) said that there was “an increasing number of research laboratories are looking to adopt microarray technology”.

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

Categories : Products and Technology

Tags :

Circuit boards made by 3D printing

April 21, 2016

Using electronics and 3D printing will enable printed circuit boards (PCBs) to be made within a business.

EE Times reports on how this convergence will affect the electronics industry “particularly around PCBs and rapid prototyping”. The 3D printed electronics space has been behind in its development due to the fact that “existing inks and printers weren’t up to the challenge”, and “these printers must be able to print conductive traces, which is the domain of printed electronics and produce components that meet the demanding requirements of aerospace, defence, consumer electronics, Internet of Things and even wearables”.PCB-3D-printed-on-Nano-Dimension's-DragonFly-2020-3D-Printer

To develop a 3D printing system for electronics involves very “precise hardware with three axes: X,Y and Z”. Speciality links are required that are made at the “nanoparticle level”, and “advanced software that ties it all together” including the conversion of “standard PCB Gerber design files” changing them from 2D to 3D “printable files”. This allows for the 3D printer to “print the substrate to the required thickness, leave and fill holes where vias are required”, and more.

Software for the design and validation of freeform circuit geometries “isn’t yet readily available in the marketplace, but will open up further electronics design abilities”. The benefits for electronics and other industries are obvious, and “PCB designers and electronic engineers are eager for the first professional printed electronics to emerge”.

There is high interest in these specific 3D printers by manufacturers, as the ability to be able to print their own prototypes of circuit boards will “speed up research and development and prototyping and even enhance customised manufactured projects”. The ability to prototype in-house will also “speed up the time it takes to build a project that normally takes weeks, to just hours”.

This new technology will help manufacturers “cutting their time to market with new products and speeding iterations and innovation around PCBs”, as with a 3D PCB printer, “they can even build and test PCBs in sections if they’d like”. Manufacturers will not have to send out their intellectual property (IP) to specialist sub-contractors, so it will no longer be “at risk”, and more importantly the ability to print PCBs offers endless “design flexibility”. This also means that designers can take more risk with creativity without slowing down the process.

The site added that “also, manufacturing currently requires multiple specialised (and expensive) techniques”, such as precision drilling, chemical etching, plating, pressing and lamination. These techniques, “which are usually outsourced to companies in Asia, could all be done easily with in-house 3D printing in just hours”, even when the PCB has “multiple layers and many interconnections”.

Speciality inks are required for aerosol printed electronics and inkjet printing and “typically use speciality silver nano-particle inks to print highly conductive traces”. 3D printing multi-layer circuitry also necessitates high- performance dielectric inks, which are “critical because they must provide just the correct amount of adhesion to work with a variety of substrates. The inks also must provide properties including conductance, controlled impedance, and other specific mechanical properties, with multi-material 3D printing offering “a way to print both metals and polymers”.

Both small and large companies will benefit from being able to “print prototypes of multi-layer PCBs” adding value and lowering costs as well as creating better designs and higher efficiency, with the article concluding: “The future of electronics will not be dictated by the rectangular board of a PCB. Rather, this new wave of 3D printing that includes PCBs will allow for circuits to be printed within objects, even playing structural roles if needed.

“The creativity of the designer will be freed and the free-form electronic circuitry will allow for improved product performance, smaller products and other significant changes to how end products look and function.”

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

Categories : Products and Technology

Tags :

New inkjet process for printing Gorilla Glass

April 20, 2016

A piece of Gorilla Glass being stress-tested

A piece of Gorilla Glass being stress-tested

Corning uses inkjet printing as latest innovation to print the smartphone screens.

The glass company Corning, which has been in business for 165 years and makes smartphone screens as well as NASA spacecraft windows, has developed an innovative technique for printing images onto Gorilla Glass. The company “has created a new process for adding images onto Gorilla Glass that could soon lead to highly customisable electronics hardware”, reports Fastco News.

Corning has called this system Vibrant Corning Gorilla Glass. Using chemically-altered ink, which allows better bonding to the glass, and an inkjet process patented by them, the process “creates higher-resolution images than other glass printing methods”, says Director of Gorilla Glass Innovations, Scott Forester.

Forester also announced that Corning is close to making public contracts with “several large brands” that will apply the system for customised exteriors on devices.

 

 

 

Don’t miss

2000x1000_Layout 1

Categories : Products and Technology

Tags :

Web design Dorset Weymouth and Portlandweb design pooleweb design witneyWeb design Weymouth and Portlandweb design oxfordshire