Australia develops printable UV sensor

June 27, 2016

sun cancerThe wearable sensor, which could be printed on an inkjet printer, changes colour when the individual has had too much UV sunlight.

Researchers will unveil the “simple paper-based UV sensor” at the International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney this week reported ninenews. The sensor is stuck to the skin, and when there has been enough UV sunlight exposure it changes colour, which alerts the wearer to get out of the sun. Chemists say that it’s “an affordable tool to prevent deadly skin cancers”.

The Australian Centre for NanoMedicine is based at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), and it is there that the chemists designed the sensor using food dyes on the sticker that change colour when exposed to sunlight. Of great importance is the ability to “tune” the patches to “individual skin types”. Parisa Sowti Khiabani, a developer from UNSW, said that “Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, and too much exposure to ultraviolet light is the primary cause”.

Professor Justin Gooding added that “it’s so simple it could be fabricated at home using an inkjet printer and tested in your backyard,” and added that it was “ready for the commercial market”.

 

 

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Ink cartridge prices criticised

June 24, 2016

Printer ink cartridges add to the cost of home printingA writer shares his opinion on the cost of replacing cartridges for his printer.

A writer for the Nevada Daily Mail discovered the “high price” he had to pay to print off baseball tickets when his print quality was faded and poor. Having followed the maintenance instructions to clean the printhead, he found that the process failed, and despite the cartridges showing that they were “more than half full”, decided to buy some more.

Richard Carpenter, who wrote the piece, said that the shock came when he saw that the price of the cartridges amounted to the same as the cost of a new printer. As his printer was old, his thought process was that if he bought the cartridges and the printer still did not work, he would be more out of pocket than if he just bought a new printer.

Discussing this option with his friends, they all came to the same conclusion that we live in a disposable world. He reminisced about repair shops for electrical products that were available in his youth and how they could fix “just about any small home electrical appliance”, and said that hardly anyone used to throw things away at that time. Now, he commented, these goods end up in large metal containers destined for China, and many of the devices on board are discarded computers and other electrical devices.

Carpenter’s journey for cartridges took him down a different road, one where he saw that the e-wastes “which create[s] dangerous chemical runoff” was becoming “an environmental disaster overseas”, adding that countries selling cheap products take them back as waste. Remarking on the fact that it is not possible to have repairs done locally, and that they have to be sent back to the manufacturer, Carpenter said that it had become easier to dispose of things than to fix them.

He now resolves to print something every two weeks to keep the ink active, and has put a reminder on his phone, but concluded by asking “what happens if the phone needs repair”.

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Inkjet technology helps save water

June 24, 2016

Scientists in Saudi Arabia are working on programmes to improve water problems in the Middle East.

Water is scarce in many countries in the Middle East, and it is predicted that this will become more difficult in the future, reports NanoverkNews beetle. Many projects have been trialed using sea water, such as using plants that remove the salt content, but this is expensive, and costs the environment and use of energy. At the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), a team led by Peng Wang have been looking for answers to the problem.

Wang’s inspiration came from nature in the form of a Stenocara beetle which lives in the Namib Desert. The insect’s wings are dotted with “nanoscale bumps that capture water droplets from the air”, and the waxy surfaces of the beetle allow the droplets to slide “directly into its mouth”. Wang said that “it’s amazing what nature can offer us for solving some of the problems of clean water production. You have to be able to define your problem scientifically first, we then rationally decide on what functions to impart to the surfaces or materials. In some cases we mimic species to reach our goals”.

To imitate the beetle’s wings, the team used an “extra –sticky dopamine-based polymer similar to natural glues used by mussel shells” to adhere “bumpy patterns onto a super water-repellent surface through inkjet printing techniques”. Wang is developing another project involving “point of use desalination devices powered by the sun”, and his team overcame the problem of timescale by coating a “floating stainless steel membrane with an innovative polymer containing photo-sensitive rings” which absorbs light instead of heavy water.

This “increases heat generation at the water surface” and then simulates the lotus leaf’s ability to repair itself after damage, which it does by using its own “reservoir of waxy molecules” – which means that sun damage can be repaired by the membrane itself. Wang commented that “this device tripled the output of fresh water compared to a typical solar still”.

The key to research success, the article noted, is down to shared resources, cooperation and communication, be that from students or scientists – each individual is important. Wang pointed out that “you see lots of casual and regular meetings in a typical day[…] we encourage members to share their knowledge, know-how, criticisms and concerns—this is how we work as a team. With generous funding and fantastic support, one can focus and do amazing things with our colleagues at the University’s Water Desalination and Reuse Centre. This is really not possible anywhere else”.
 

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PRINTek launches remanufactured inkjets

June 23, 2016

printek2The remanufacturer has launched a range of remanufactured inkjet cartridges for HP Inc printers.

The cartridge launched include: the 934XL and 935XL black and colour cartridges, alongside the 934 black; the 302XL in black and colour; and the 302XXL in black and colour. The 934XL and 935XL cartridges feature 45 and 12 millilitres respectively of ink, while the 934 black features 18 millilitres; the 302XL black features nine millilitres and the colours eight millilitres; and the 302XXLs both feature 15 millilitres.

Gyorgy Koppany, Managing Director of PRINTek, commented: “Our new releases are all offering much higher yield than the OEM products with the same quality and functionality.”

For more information, visit www.printek.hu.

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Riso launches business inkjet printers

June 22, 2016

The OEM has released the ComColor FW Series in the US for the business inkjet market.

risocomcolorfw-in-247x300

The printers are said to be the “latest advance in high speed colour printing”, reported Graphic Arts, and are the fifth release of these cut-sheet, colour inkjet printers, with the FW series is more sleek than previously as it has an “integrated face down tray”. There is a full colour touch panel and the output is 120ppm in colour.

The ComColor inkjet printers “utilise Riso’s exclusive Forcejet technology”, and this “heatless imaging system requires no fusing during the printing process and has a short, straight paper path, enabling extremely high printing speeds in full colour, and a cold, flat and dry output that’s ideal for transitioning to finishing equipment”.

 

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Ink tank colour printers better for SMBs

June 8, 2016

They are said to be more cost-effective and feature better print quality.printers-624x351

The ink tank was invented in 1867, but it has only recently been scaled down, reports First Post. Most businesses use laser printers for document printing because it is fast and reliable, but printing in colour is “three times more” expensive. The cheaper way to print colour is to use an inkjet printer, the article states, as they need less power to run and the colour print quality is better. Cartridges can be costly to replace frequently, so to solve this problem the ink tank was designed.

Due to new printhead and cartridge technology, the quality of printing is now as good as other printers. The cost of printing is just “one fourth of a conventional inkjet”, and for significant savings the print volume for each month should be as near the “maximum that the printer can handle”, which is normally 5,000 to 15,000 pages a month. The report advises “as near as possible” to the maximum and not to go over the limit.

The ink tank printer, the piece notes, is more functional for SMBs of two to 10 people, and are made for “bulk colour printing” as they support all kinds of paper, and print good quality prints, but above all bring huge savings on inkjet cartridges.

 

 

 

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HP Inc launches “world’s smallest” AIO

June 2, 2016

HP Inc's DeskJet 3755

HP Inc’s DeskJet 3755

The DeskJet 3755 is a wireless AIO that is said to help workers “reclaim [their] cluttered workspace”.

CNet reported on the new inkjet machine, which is said to be the “world’s smallest all-in-one” with “both paper trays folded up”, measuring only 15.86 inches (40.3 centimetres) wide, 6.97 inches (17.7 centimetres) deep and 5.55 inches (14.1 centimetres) tall. This is only “fractions of an inch smaller” than Epson’s Expression Home XP-430, a machine CNet notes “calls itself the ‘small-in-one’”.

The device uses two inkjet cartridges, one three-colour and one black cartridge, and can be used as part of HP Inc’s Instant Ink programme, as well as being available in three colours. The news site notes that the machine can help “reclaim your cluttered workspace”, especially as “inkjet printers are so aesthetically forgettable that they usually live underneath a desk, hidden out of the sight until the occasional homework assignment, reservation confirmation or airplane ticket gives them a job to do”.

The site also highlights the printer’s “refreshing” nature “on two levels”, as it features a “clean, bright design” and is “small enough to fit into a cramped dorm room or home-office work space”. The DeskJet 3755 is available now in the USA for $69.99 (€62.44), and the DeskJet 3720 model – in the same range – is now available in the UK for £54.99.

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The importance of cleaning printheads

May 31, 2016

All printers with four or more cartridges have a printhead, and an article discusses the importance of keeping them clean 

printer

An article from Cartridge Network’s Griffin Hampson for Portland Tribune  stated that “any inkjet printer with four or more ‘tank; ink cartridges has a separate printhead” and that this is different to “the two-cartridge system; a black and a tri-colour cartridge, where the printhead is a physical component of each cartridge”.

All printheads “clog up” from lack of use, too much use and general use” the article says, and OEM printers from Brother, Epson, Canon and HP Inc have printheads that need cleaning. About 15 percent of people carry out this task and 75 percent don’t know about it, with the other 10 percent knowing about it but not carrying out the task. Hampson previously discussed printers, toner and third-party cartridges.

The printhead can be cleaned directly from the printer or the computer, and a test page will show if all the “nozzles are printing correctly”; if they are clogged, the task will need to be repeated, and if the problem is severe then this will have to be done many times. If the printer printheads are too clogged, it can damage the printer which is expensive, though this can be prevented by using the previously-mentioned simple process which “increases productivity and print quality”.

 

 

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Resolving dry ink problems

May 31, 2016

Some useful tips were given to address problems with ink cartridges.

A collection of HP Inc inkjet cartridges found on beaches (Credit: Marianne Odendahl)

 

A common reason for print problems is that inkjet cartridges “dry out” says a report in Expert Reviews. If the printer has been dormant for a while, the ink can become clogged and dry and therefore the printer cannot print. Another reason is that the cartridge’s use by date may have expired, in which case they will not work. Refilling cartridges can be problematic if air gets into the cartridge, as this also causes the ink to dry up.

To resolve these problems, the article advises first using the printer head cleaning function, but if there is a complete blockage this will not work or if some of the colours print then it is easy to “identify” the colour that has dried out. If the printer is not going to be used on a regular basis, it is recommended that the cartridges are removed from the printer so keeping the “protective covers” they come with is a good idea, or using “clingfilm” will suffice. This will preserve the cartridge for the next printing job.

 

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Armor expands inkjet range

May 31, 2016

The remanufacturer has launched alternative inkjet cartridges for consumers.K12628

The cartridges are compatible for printers using the Epson 26XL and also cover 14 other Epson models from the Expression Premium range. These printers are marketed for home use, and being multifunctional are “ideal for family use”.

Armor Office Printing offers these cartridges in “individual boxes and blisters as well as in five cartridge packs”, with the colours including cyan, magenta, yellow, photo black and black cartridges. In turn, the black cartridge is “included for free”. These compatible cartridges provide a “saving of 40 percent” compared to “retail OEM price”. The cartridges are guaranteed, and Armor’s solutions can be “mixed with the original cartridges” within the printer without loss of performance.

The company says that its cartridges “cover over 95 percent of [the] western Europe install base” and that it has “always invested heavily in R&D and production to guarantee premium printing performances and yet significant savings for the end-users”. Armor also declared its expertise in three “main technologies […] new inkjet, remanufactured inkjet and remanufactured laser”.

For more information, visit www.armor-print.com.

 

 

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