GSC Imaging announce new website

May 19, 2016

Director of Sales, Chris Crear, announced the news on Linkedin. GSC Screengrab copy

GSC, the developer and manufacturer of high performance digital inkjet inks, have a new website, www.gscimaging.com. There is a new feature called “ink finder” where customers can search for “specific inks” by printer model, ink cartridge number, OEM brand name or GSC Imaging ink product codes. If the product cannot be found there is a contact page where a brief description can be given. The company also offer custom ink development and toll management.

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Inkjet workshop returning to UK

May 13, 2016

The workshop from iFormulate Ltd is being repeated in the UK.inkjet

The workshops were hosted twice in 2014, once in May and once in July, and iFormulate has now announced that the “popular training workshop” is to be repeated in 2016. The one-day training event covers “the essentials of formulation for inkjet applications”, and is “designed to benefit scientists and technologists involved in inkjet formulation as well as in the digital printing supply chain”.

The next event will be held in the East Midlands on 9 June, and attendees at the Inkjet Formulation Fundamentals workshop will “learn about the principles of inkjet printing and better understand the science underpinning stable ink formulation, the colorants used in inkjet and the function and performance of the main additives used in aqueous inkjet formulations”.

Visitors will also be able to learn how “inks and prints are tested”, and “gain an overview of newer and growing applications for inkjet technology such as textile printing and 3D printing”. To find out more about registering to attend the workshop, and more information on the workshops themselves, visit http://iformulate.biz/training-and-events/ink-jet-formulation-fundamentals/ or email [email protected].

Dr Jim Bullock, Director at iFormulate, commented: “We saw a very good response when we first held the workshop, so we have decided to hold it again in 2016. New inkjet applications and markets continue to growing rapidly, so we think there is scope for good value training in this area. We are pleased to say that our Associate Partner and experienced industry professional Mark Holbrook will join us once again to deliver the workshop on 9 June. We think the attendees will find the workshop very valuable.”

 

 

 

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Inkjet technology used to cool electronics

May 6, 2016

Scientists have discovered a method which could lead to “advanced cooling systems for more efficient electronic devices”.untitled

Scientists at Oregon State University (OSU) have discovered that by manipulating the amount of bubbles that appear in boiling water, they can then control how much “heat and steam is released in the process” it was reported by Gizmag. Using a piezoelectric inkjet printer to “print water repelling polymer dots onto a substrate”, they then placed a “water friendly zinc oxide nanostructure” on top of the substrate – this structure only grows in “spaces where there are no polymer dots”.

Scientists can control “where and when the bubbles form” precisely by altering the “hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance of the material”. This allows regulation of the “boiling and condensation processes” and how much transfer of heat there is during this time. These processes could be perfected to keep operating temperatures low by releasing heat and would enhance applications such as “solar energy, advanced lasers and other electronics”.

Chih-hung Chang, a Professor of Electrical Engineering at OSU, said: “One of the key limitations for electronic devices is the heat they generate, and something that helps dissipate that heat will help them operate at faster speeds and prevent failure; the more bubbles you can generate, the more cooling you can achieve.

The favourable side effect of this technology is its “ability to produce steam at lower temperatures”. This could improve clothing irons and industrial boiler systems. According to the researchers, they have validated the technology on large surfaces and are assured that it will be capable of commercial scale and use.

 

 

 

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Jet Tec launches remanufactured HP Inc inkjets

May 6, 2016

The remanufacturing brand has added remanufactured 970XL and 971XL inkjet cartridges to its product range.HP970BXL

Jet Tec stated that the new series of inkjets will “further extend their portfolio”, and “comes in quick succession to the new remanufactured Brother, HP, Kyocera and Lexmark toners” that it released in March. The company noted in turn that it “prides itself on being a leader within the industry, and having had a particularly productive year so far, will continue to develop new and exciting products to launch throughout 2016”.

Jet Tec also added that it has “20 years of knowledge and remanufacturing experience, and heavily invests into research and development”, with its “consistently high standards ensur[ing] that the best quality inkjets and toners are produced”, while its quality guarantee “reinforces the confidence that they have in their products”.

Tony Speed, Sales Manager at DCI Jet Tec, commented: “The remanufactured HP970XL/971XL inkjetd cartridges are a key addition to our remanufactured inkjet product range. The high capacity of these cartridges provides yield to match various key toners on the market, and hence offers an excellent alternative for the smaller business customers. We have received a lot of interest in these and are pleased to be one of the first to bring a quality remanufactured version to the market.”

For more information, visit www.jettec.com.

 

 

 

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Lasers built using inkjet printers

May 4, 2016

Printed lasers have been developed by a team of French and Hungarian researchers.640_maxresdefault%20(1)

The team has produced a cheap organic laser using an inkjet printer, E&T reports, adding that “the technology is made possible with organic lasers, which amplify light with carbon-containing materials”. The new project may enable them to be manufactured at a very low cost, meaning that they could be thrown away if they failed.

The site added that “organic lasers are not as common as inorganic lasers, like those found in laser pointers, DVD players, and optical mice, but they offer benefits such as high-yield photonic conversion, easy fabrication, low-cost and a wide range of wavelengths”. Sebastien Sanaur, who worked on the project, said that “the low-cost and easiness of laser chip fabrication are the most significant aspects of our results”.

Most customers are accustomed with the type of inkjet printer used in offices, and this technology can be “adapted to print electronic circuits, pharmaceutical drugs and even biological cells”. Sanaur described the process, noting that “by [using] piezoelectric printing, you print where you want, when you want, without wasting raw materials”, explaining that “the process does not require masks, can be done at room temperature and can print on flexible material”.

During the process, the researchers tested many inks but decided to use a commercial ink variety called “EMD6415” which was then “mixed with dyes” before it was “printed in small square shapes onto a quartz slide”. This enables the “dyed ink” to “act as the core of the laser, called a gain medium”, which in turn “amplifies light and produces the characteristically narrow, single-colour laser beam”.

To keep the light magnification, working the laser requires “mirrors to reflect back and forth through the gain medium and an energy source called a pump”. The printed gain medium or “lasing capsule” is disposable, and it is estimated that it could be made for a “few pence”, and could be easily replaced when it wears out.

Two different types of dyes were used to “produce laser emission, ranging from yellow to red,” but it is predicted by the team that dyes of blue and green could also be used. Researchers claim that “with further development, the inexpensive inkjet-printed laser could send data over short plastic fibres and serve as a tool for analysing chemical or biological samples”.

 

 

 

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Epson recommends cartridge-free printers

May 4, 2016

Small businesses could benefit by using the EcoTank line, the OEM added.

The Epson Eco Tank system

The Epson Eco Tank system

The common goal for small businesses, of which there are estimated to be 28 million in the US, is to “maximise efficiency to achieve business goals”, Epson said. With its wide collection of printers for business that now use the Supertank and large ink reservoirs instead of ink cartridges, the OEM recommends that these could be more cost-effective for SMBs. To determine whether these printers are right for the individual business, Epson outlined five reasons why they could be.

Addressing the consumer, Epson said: “If you print a lot of documents – upwards of hundreds of pages per month – low user intervention is a top priority. Cartridge-free solutions, like the WorkForce ET-4550 EcoTank AIO, print up to 11,000 black and 8,500 colour pages before the ink needs to be replaced, making it ideal for business with a high-volume printing requirements.”

With the ability to print up to “two years worth of ink before they need to be refilled” the EcoTank printer eliminates the “out of ink frustration” and the inconvenience of ordering when there is a deadline. Many SMBs use colour printing for their promotions and to distinguish themselves from other businesses, but in the past this was seen as a large expense. With the large tank system, colour printing is more cost-effective, so more colourful documents can be printed.

The OEM advises that “It’s always important to invest in solutions that will deliver the best return of investment to maximise productivity without breaking the bank”. When the time comes to replace the ink SMBs can “save up to 80 percent with low-cost bottles”.

Maintaining a stress-free environment requires “office technology solutions that keep their operations streamlined and efficient” and cartridge-free printers “like the EcoTank series offer and unbeatable combination of convenience and value” allowing the company to “focus on achieving business goals” without having to worry about smaller operations.

 

 

 

 

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Armor enters industrial inkjet market

May 3, 2016

a2i_inkproduction_cmyk_300dpiThe remanufacturer has created a new business devoted to industrial inks, and has hired industry veteran Frank de Jonge to work in the new company.

In a press release, the company announced the new business, which is said to be a “response” to “new forward-facing challenges” that are arising from inks being applied to “surfaces made from ever more complex materials”. Such challenges include energy, electronics and air de-pollution, and the new business aims to help by “providing industrial customers with state-of-the-art expertise in industrial inks for digital printing applications”.

Calling the new business a “revolution in the inks market”, Armor stated that “for the first time” it is “opening up its inks expertise to other industrial users”, through “diversifying and launching a new business dedicated to the development and the production of high quality industrial inks”. New applications in “ever more extensive fields” include glass, floors, furniture and textiles, with the “expanding market” for inks and digital printing bringing “more flexibility and adding well-qualified jobs”.

In the medium term, the company’s new industrial inks will be used in “other innovative applications” such as energy and “cutting-edge electronics” like conductive inks for printed electronics, insulation or photo-catalytic inks, which “contribute to cleansing the air”. Additionally, the company has hired industry veteran Frank de Jonge, previously of Sensient, to work in the new business.

The “ambitious project” has seen teams of chemists “mobilised” throughout Europe, with research and development led from France and Germany, and final ink formulation in Germany before manufacturing takes place in Poland. Armor stated that “business has already kicked off”, with its first industrial partnerships put in place at the beginning of the year.

Hubert de Boisredon, Chairman and CEO of Armor, commented: “This new business is the fourth pillar in the Armor Group’s expansion. The company’s ambition is to offer innovative technology grounded in sustainable growth. Digital printing is used to print ‘on demand’, eliminating stocks and therefore encouraging material savings in colourings and substrates.

“We are aiming for very high growth markets, making available our world-renowned expertise in inks, our R&D that is resolutely targeted at sustainable growth and our production machinery that is immediately available.”

 

 

 

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KMP launches range of Brother cartridges

April 29, 2016

kmp1The company has released alternatives for use in a wide range of the OEM’s inkjet printers.

KMP stated that the MFPs in the range including the DCP-J240DW “allow for duplex printing and prints up to DIN A3 size”, as well as having wireless connectivity, and the three different cartridges launched work in the “numerous printer models of this series” – alternatives for the LC223 standard and LC-225XL and LC-227XLBK high yield cartridges.

The KMP products contain pigmented black ink for “sharp text printing” and CMY dye inks for “optimum colour fidelity”, and the cartridges can be used in the following printers: the DCP-J4120DW; J562DW; MFC-J1100; MFC-J1140W; MFC-J1150DW; MFC-J1170DW; MFC-J1180DWT; MFC-J4420DW; MFC-J4620DW; MFC-J4625DW; MFC-J480DW; MFC-J5320DW; MFC-J5600; MFC-J5620DW; MFC-J5625DW; MFC-J5720DW; MFC-J680DW; MFC-J880DW; and MFC-J 4425DW.

With the LC-223, KMP has launched a single, double and multipack set of cartridges, with the single CMYK cartridges featuring respective standard and high yields of 550 pages and 1,200 pages respectively, as well as a chip.

For more information, visit www.kmp.com.

 

 

 

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Ink innovation for the blind

April 22, 2016

jwt_touchable_ink_mapNew technology enables braille printing through normal printers.

A new ink based solution called Touchable Ink has been developed by advertising agency, J Walter Thompson Bangkok, Thammasat University and Samsung Thailand. Using a normal printer, the new technology will “enable braille printing on normal paper” and will be cheaper than using a braille printer”, with the ink said to possibly be “a reliable substitute to the old coding system”.

Allowing “embossed printing of non-braille characters and other shapes and patterns”, this has endless prospects. Satit Jantawiwat, CCO at J. Walter Thompson Bangkok, said: “This will open up a new world to people with visual impairment and revolutionise their knowledge accessibility. Some of them were born blind and have never really known many things that may be common for people with normal vision, such as math symbols, musical notation symbols, and drawings or paintings.

“Touchable Ink gives them the key to unlock this door and enter a more resourceful world of tactile sensations, either to ease their everyday life or to broaden their accessibility to more fields of learning like music, mathematics and art, for example.”

The new invention is being tested at the Thailand Association of the Blind using equipment and research and development consultation from Thai Samsung Electronics. The Department of Chemistry and J. Walter Thompson Bangkok are now proceeding with patenting.

Parattajariya Jalayanateja, Managing Director of J. Walter Thompson Bangkok, added: “The Touchable Ink project began from a study of visually-impaired people that led to better awareness of their needs. As a group of people who are part of our society, their needs are not different from people who can see. They want to live happily like people who have normal vision. They are proud to be self-reliant, being able to perform small and big tasks themselves and minimize their dependence on other people.”

Dr. Nopparat Plucktaveesak, Head of Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Thammasat University, commented: “This Touchable Ink innovation was a source of much pride for the university. It is a Thai invention that, with continuing support and development further on, has the potential to benefit visually impaired people worldwide. It would enable the blind people to print from normal printer with price starts less than THB 2,000 ($/€57), instead of braille embosser which costs at least THB 100,000 ($/€2,537).”

 

 

 

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Inkjet technology used to print DNA

April 22, 2016

UK company Arrayjet has launched a consultancy for life sciences, offering its bio-printing expertise as a service.imgID59576689_jpg-pwrt3

Herald Scotland reports that the instrumental company is offering its expertise worldwide, in bio-printing to businesses that are involved in life science. Using printers with inkjet print heads, biological material which includes DNA taken from a single gene, protein or antibody is printed onto glass slides.

This creates microarrays which are similar to a microchip in size and information, and are used for “biological screening in large scale diagnostic or genetic tests”. Arrayjet Advance Service offers its company’s scientific team as well as the automated laboratory site which will offer accurate and rapid analytics using inkjet technology. CEO Iain McWilliam (pictured) said that there was “an increasing number of research laboratories are looking to adopt microarray technology”.

 

 

 

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